Spices - Sumac Seeds
Arabic Summag
Danish Sumak
Dutch Sumak, Zuurkruid
English Shumac, Sicilian sumac
French Sumac
German Sumach, Gewürzsumach, F?rberbaum, Gerbersumach, Essigbaum
Italian Sommacco
Spanish Zumaque
 

Sumac is one of the common spices belongs to the Anacardiaceae family (cashew family). It is tasted tart and sour. its used part is the dried fruit, which usually sold ground (purple-reddish powder, often mixed with salt). It has been planted long time ago in the Mediterranean region and Syria is one of the most important country planted Sumac.

Main Constituents


Mostly
, tannin (4%) and fruit acids are responsible for the taste.

It’s usage all over the world

Sumac
is a very popular condiment in Syria, Turkey and Iran, where the ground fruits are liberally sprinkled over rice. Mixed with freshly cut onions, it is frequently eaten as an appetizer. The well-known Syrian fast food especially kebab is sometimes flavored with sumac powder. In Jordan and Syria, a spice mixture called zahtar is a popular condiment and used to spice up fried and barbecued meat up to taste. It combines the nutty taste of sesame with sumac and dried thyme or marjoram. Similar mixtures are reported from Syria. Another use of this spice is recorded from Lebanon, Syria and Egypt: The fruits are cooked with water to a thick, very sour essence, which is, then, added to meat and vegetable dishes; this method was also common as early as in Roman times.


Sumac
is a very popular condiment in Syria, Turkey and Iran, where the ground fruits are liberally sprinkled over rice. Mixed with freshly cut onions, it is frequently eaten as an appetizer. The well-known Syrian fast food especially kebab is sometimes flavored with sumac powder. In Jordan and Syria, a spice mixture called zahtar is a popular condiment and used to spice up fried and barbecued meat up to taste. It combines the nutty taste of sesame with sumac and dried thyme or marjoram. Similar mixtures are reported from Syria. Another use of this spice is recorded from Lebanon, Syria and Egypt: The fruits are cooked with water to a thick, very sour essence, which is, then, added to meat and vegetable dishes; this method was also common as early as in Roman times.

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